Adipose is a consultancy firm focused on helping start-ups grow. Founded in 2013, the firm helps media, fin-tech and wellness companies create products to sell, partnerships to scale, and growth plans for the future.

We believe it’s a customer journey -- not a marketing funnel - no matter what your business is.

Gretchen’s work with some of the her favorite media brands and companies, BuzzFeed, Time, Inc.Bloomberg, Esquire Magazine and --  particularly -- helping to found and launch Quartz have all contributed to the Adipose way of thinking: to adapt to new water is actually the only way to thrive.

The lifecycle of a salmon is remarkably close to the many life-cycles of a business on their way towards growth and scaling. And, learning to adapt to each new water you’re in - and knowing that this, too, is water - is actually the only way to thrive.  

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Fertilized salmon eggs are born in fresh water, they spend up to two years of their young life in fresh water - often a lake - and then eventually migrate to a ocean where they live out the course of their adult life. (Sockeye for a few years, a chinook salmon could live up to eight years in the salt water!)

 

When they are ready to procreate, they make the long and treacherous journey back to the freshwater where they were born, where they spawn and die. 

 

Such a heroic journey in a short little life - and one that shows us that possibilities are endless, adaptation is endless, and that you, too, can thrive in many different environments as you grow. 

Today we deploy this way of thinking for companies large and small and would be happy to talk with you about yours.

The Adipose Fin (#4 on the below diagram) is the compass of the animal. Long thought to be a piece of fatty tissue, it is now known that the Adipose Fin brings the salmon - who lives the duration of his or her life in the saltwater ocean hundreds of miles away - back home to within 5 feet of where he or she was born to spawn and create new life

The Adipose Fin (#4) is the fin behind a Dorsal Fin (#3) on a salmon:

 

 

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